Category Archives: Lego

LEGO Pick-a-brick container sizes, dimensions and capacity

There are three Pick A Brick containers – The 950ml tumbler, 475ml tumbler and 30ml lid. I have measured the volume of these containers using a 0.1g scale and water; I have high confidence in the measurements. Other measurements have been taken with callipers and rulers; I have lower levels of confidence in those numbers.

The lid’s stud (where you can store LEGO if you’re particularly cunning) is 48mm diameter and approximately 16mm deep – six studs in diameter by two studs deep. This means you can’t fit something six studs wide (48mm) into it, because LEGO bricks aren’t 0mm tall or long. You might be able to store one 1×6 plate if you jammed it in, as plastic objects are plastic (bendy).

The 475ml tumbler has a profile matching that of the 950ml tumber, cut off at the bottom. They share an opening of over 100mm. They both have an indentation that matches that in the lid, allowing stacking. The displacement of the indentation of the base is 55mm wide and has three strengthening piers projecting into the interior of the base.

The length of the interior wall top-to-bottom depth of the 475ml tumbler is 76mm; it can hold 1675 1×1 round plates. The top-to-bottom depth of the 950ml tumbler is 170mm.

BrickLink API PushNotificationMethod Get Notifications callback semantics

The documentation for the BrickLink API PushNotificationMethod suggests that the data sent to the URL you registered on the BrickLink API Consumer Registration Page is sent to this URL (via a POST verb, by the way) and as such you don’t need to call Get Notifications. Given the body of the POST is empty, this is not right – what you instead need to do is use any POST to your registered URL as a prompt to call Get-Notifications. It’s probably best to periodically call it too, given “it does not guarantee delivery of all events” and doesn’t either based on my experience.

A notification to be created when:

  • Order
    • You received a new order.
    • Buyer updates an order status.
    • Items of an order are updated (added or deleted).
  • Message
    • You received a new message.
  • Feedback
    • You received a new feedback or reply

Also note: NULL fields are not included in the returned JSON. Some fields names don’t match the documentation (eg: drive_thru_sent instead of the documented sent_drive_thru).

LEGO nerds: Brickvention 2011 is coming!

If you’ve got nothing planned for Sunday, January 16th head on down to Melbourne town hall to have a look at the largest collection of LEGO models ever seen in Australia. For example, The Love Boat

Entry is $6/adult, $3/child, or $15/family – details at Brickventures

Open 10am-5pm

God says: LEGO bad

LEGO bricks can make you gay, because they go together so many ways and encourage experimentation.

You’ll probably be okay if you’ve only got them for “research purposes”.

Another random LEGO part

If you’ve got 18 tiny cardboard boxes, all labelled 4508197 – they contain a cape, from the Dwarve’s Mine. That should be in Google now.

Google Lego Logo

What with the Firefox Google page, and the customisable iGoogle, it’s less common these days to see the full-size Google logo, and its special event variations.

So you might have missed this: Google celebrated the 50th birthday of Lego (which was on Monday).

Google: Lego 50th birthday

PS. I forgot to go to the Lego convention thing on Sunday, dammit.

PPS. Chewing Pixels highlights some great Lego finds

Melbourne, Australia Day weekend: Lego

Doesn’t time fly? It seems like only last year Brickvention was on, but it was two years ago. This time ’round it’s being held opposite Flinders Street station, details at the Brickvention 2008 website. As to what to expect: check out the 2006 website, which has some pretty impressive models on it.

LEGO string

If you find a small white box with 4500584 written on it, it has Lego string in it. Googling 4500584 lego didn’t find anything, but now it should.

Escher + Legoâ„¢

Sweet merciful mind-melting God! Photos of Lego implementations of Escher drawings are back on the web.

People People People: the pural of Lego is Lego. Like with sheep. In fact, I think Lego likes their bricks to be called “LEGO bricks” (yelling and all), to distinguish from the company.