Copyright, shmopyright

Lots of information on Australian copyright law, sorted into handy fact sheets.

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6 thoughts on “Copyright, shmopyright

  1. Lachlan Wetherall

    Even if a CD is “no longer commercially available” you still can’t legally copy it. You have to wait for the copyright to expire or get permission from the copyright owner.

    I really hope that the government can introduce some sanity into the copyright laws in its current review of the copyright situation.

  2. Anonymous

    Did you read the bit towards the end about the information sheet? They don’t even let you copy that!! You’re allowed to download and print ONE copy of it!

  3. Robin

    So, in fact, using iTunes to rip music off a CD you purchased and dump that on your iPod is illegal in Australia?? That’s a whole lotta lawsuits just waiting to happen…

    Re: Timeshifting video – similarlarly, Foxtel IQ – sold to us specifically for that purpose.

    Well, it’s consistent at least – it’s still legal to sell toxic poisons specifically for human consumption (eg. cigarettes), even though it’s illegal to systematically poison someone unto death.

    Oh well, time to illegally load some more CDs onto my iPod 🙂

  4. Phil

    Foxtel IQ is legal because you’re paying to continue using it, and you’re paying someone who is presumably authorised to sell it. It’s not copying at all, really, because it’s just allowing you to watch a program again when you like, but only if you keep paying. If you stop paying your IQ no longer lets you watch recordings.

    So it’s just like adjusting the TV schedule to suit yourself (which is what a proper video recorder or PVR allows, but the crucial difference is that those allow you to do it without pouring more money into the accounts of the TV companies).

  5. josh

    I don’t understand why copyright lasts longer than a patent – really, which is more useful to society, a song or the design of a pen? Why do songs get 70+ years of protection?

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